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Tag:college football playoff
Posted on: November 23, 2008 1:12 pm
Edited on: January 7, 2009 2:06 pm
 

My college football playoff plan

The BCS is a complete joke, and everyone knows it.  Here is my plan for a 16-team playoff.  Why 16 teams and not 8?  If there are only 8 teams, there are not enough spots to guarantee an automatic bid for major conference champions as well as at-large teams who are worthy of playing for a national title, and you still leave out quality teams.  And for those who say that 16 teams are too many, or the season would be too long, the Division II playoff has 24 teams.<o:p></o:p>

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The number of conferences that get automatic bids will expand to include all 11 conferences.<o:p></o:p>

The conference champions for the every Division 1 conference will receive an automatic bid.  There will be 5 at-large teams.<o:p></o:p>

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Under no circumstances does Notre Dame receive an automatic spot.<o:p></o:p>

A team more worthy of inclusion should not be left out due to Notre Dame’s reputation.  Notre Dame has been mostly irrelevant for the better part of 2 decades now.  The only way they can get in is to either join a conference and win it, or earn an at-large berth as an independent.  While they may not like this, I doubt that they will choose to be left out of the playoff, giving up a chance at the money, as well as having to tell recruits that if they go to Notre Dame, they have no shot at a national championship.<o:p></o:p>

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Polls will not be taken until after the fifth week of the season.<o:p></o:p>

One of the most ridiculous things about college football is that a bunch of sportswriters and coaches can determine a team’s destiny BEFORE A SINGLE DOWN IS EVEN PLAYED.  News services may feel free to issue polls during the preseason and first four weeks of the season, but those polls shall not be used in the rankings to determine the playoff teams.  By waiting until after Week 5, voters have a better feel for which teams are actually worthy of being ranked due to their on-field performance.  Seedings and eligibility will be determined by a committee using polls and a Ratings Percentage Index similar to the NCAA Basketball Tournament committee.  Require the committee to meet several times over the course of the regular season as the NCAA basketball committee does so that information can be shared on all teams so that teams aren't overlooked because committee members haven't seen them play.  Also, encourage the committee members to attend games so that they can see teams in person (again, like the basketball committee).

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The traditional bowl games may be worked into the system if they want; otherwise, they’re officially relegated to worthlessness.

I am very much a traditionalist when it comes to sports, but the bowls lost all credibility when they started selling naming rights to their games and moving them off New Year’s Day to accommodate TV, then allowing themselves to be co-opted by the BCS.  The Big Four bowl games (Sugar, Fiesta, Orange, and Rose) shall be given a chance to take part in a rotating system: 2 teams shall host the National Semifinal (Final 4) playoff games, one shall host a 3<sup>rd</sup>-place game for the Final 4 losers, and one shall host the National Championship game.  If any bowl chooses not to take part, pick another bowl.  Again, as with Notre Dame, with the money involved, no one will want to be left out.<o:p></o:p>

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Teams shall play no more than 11 regular season games.

In order to allow for up to 4 playoff games, their regular season shall be limited to 11 games (and a conference championship game if the conference has one).<o:p></o:p>

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The higher-seeded team shall host games in the first two rounds.

They’ve earned the right to home playoff games.  After the first two rounds, games can move to a neutral-site.<o:p></o:p>

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com